Day 122 – Candied Ginger

Hello Yearlings!

I can officially say that I have finally seen Point Break. Personally I don’t get it, but I guess it was cool in the nineties. At the very least it was a new life experience and people can’t make fun of my for not having seen it any more. Moving on! Today was a lazily productive that basically involved me trying to science my way around crystalizing ginger.

So from everything I read about crystalizing, or candying,  ginger there are basically two different schools of thought: you can either cook the ginger directly in the sugar syrup, take it out once it becomes translucent and allow it to cool on a rack, saving the syrup for a later date. On the other hand you can soften the ginger by boiling it in water first, then allow it to cook in the syrup until all of the moisture is lost and the sugar crystalizes in the pot. I decided to mix a bit of both of these techniques so that I would get a low moisture ginger candy with a smooth beautiful look.

Take your ginger and, cutting it into relatively equal portions, weigh it out. Then boil it in a pot of water until it begins to become translucent.
Take your ginger and, cutting it into relatively equal portions, weigh it out. Then boil it in a pot of water until it begins to become translucent.
Drain your ginger into a collinder and reserve some of the liquid to use in your syrup. You can re-weigh your ginger but it shouldn't have taken on too much more water weight.
Drain your ginger into a collinder and reserve some of the liquid to use in your syrup. You can re-weigh your ginger but it shouldn’t have taken on too much more water weight.
Weigh out your sugar in the exact same amount as your ginger. So for me that was 3.4 oz. Then add just enough of your reserved liquid to barely cover the sugar and ginger. Bring to a boil on high heat, lower to a simmer and allow to cook until almost all of that water has evaporated and the liquid has condensed down to almost nothing.
Weigh out your sugar in the exact same amount as your ginger. So for me that was 3.4 oz. Then add just enough of your reserved liquid to barely cover the sugar and ginger. Bring to a boil on high heat, lower to a simmer and allow to cook until almost all of that water has evaporated and the liquid has condensed down to almost nothing.
Space out on a cooling rack over parchment paper and allow to cool/crystalize for several hours. Then just store it in an airtight container at room temperature.
Space out on a cooling rack over parchment paper and allow to cool/crystalize for several hours. Then just store it in an airtight container at room temperature.

Crystalized ginger is actually really cool because if it’s properly stored it will last basically forever. It’s also great for helping to lessen the symptoms of motion sickness as mothers everywhere can tell you. I will warn you, however, this is a very intense flavor! I can’t actually do a large amount of ginger because it’s so hot, it’s a lot like raw garlic in that way. Alex on the other hand can eat this stuff like candy and he gets motion sickness very easily so I’m hoping that this will help him next time we’re on a long road trip.

Lots of Love,

Maya

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